Starting as you mean to continue – gratitude in the morning

My Mum recently found an old Garfield toy of mine in her attic. I loved Garfield as a child – we both liked lasagne and hated mornings.

garfieldmornings

July in New Zealand means dark winter mornings – getting up when it’s dark outside puts me out of kilter and can leave a cloud hanging over my whole day. Spring will come, but in the meantime, I’m open to strategies to beat the winter blues.

I found some inspiration in June’s Gratitude Circle posts – both Connie and Riley wrote of how they’ve benefited from starting their days with a simple gratitude practice. I resolved to give it a try with the hope of improving my morning mindset and outlook during the day.

How did I go?

Sadly, cure the winter blues it did not, but a few moments of gratitude before rising warmed my heart and has awoken an appreciation for my secure and abundant life.

Upon waking, I simply list the things I’m grateful for. A definite pattern emerged. Invariably, my first thoughts of thanks is for my snuggly, warm bed. As I contemplate getting out of my snuggly, warm bed I’m thankful that I live in a warm home, that I can afford to flick the heater on and enjoy a warm shower. A snore or snuffle from my husband or son turns my thoughts to my family and how grateful I am for their existence, their love, their support and their good health. As I consider the day ahead, I appreciate the freedom I have to plan my day, the choices and opportunities open to me and the level of self-determination that I exercise.

This simple practice, and its daily repetition, imbues me with a real sense of contentment. While I was safe, secure and free all along, I now feel safe, secure and free. Starting the day feeling this, and mindful that my family has all the necessities under control with no major worries or hardships, certainly brings a new perspective to my usual daily dramas.

I’m still no fan of mornings and I’m hanging out for spring, but a little gratitude in the morning makes each day a little brighter from the inside out. I intend to continue with it.

Thanks to Connie and Riley for the inspiration.

Are you a morning person? What morning routines do you use to set yourself up for the day?

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Zeroing in on food waste

It is Friday, so it’s time to check in about my food waste over the last fortnight.

Shopping, food waste, food waste friday
What’s going into my freezer after this morning’s supermarket shop

Above zero

I am pleased to report that last week was another zero food-waste week, however unfortunately this week we wasted half a scoop of chips. It was a classic case of our eyes being bigger than our stomachs when ordering at the local fish and chip shop. My husband diligently cleaned up and threw them out before I managed to make a move to save them. I was going to try to reheat them the next day – they’d probably be quite soggy I’d imagine!

Below zero

Unpacking my groceries this morning reminded me how much I use my freezer to reduce my food waste. This week’s shopping included more frozen food than average as we’d run out of a few things at once. We have always frozen our bread but since we bought a large freezer about two years ago I have used it to freeze an increasing range of things, especially seasonal fruit. I also use the freezer a for batch food preparation, like making a huge pot of chilli and using it as a base for several meals. I often cook up and freeze veggies, like pumpkin and broccoli, which I freeze in small quantities to sneak into my son’s (and my husband’s) meals.

This is my first go at freezing butter. I don’t usually buy much butter, but it was short dated and selling at half price. When I saw the butter advertised via social media I was impressed by more than the price – the supermarket also mentioned that butter freezes well. I often think supermarket specials, especially multi-buys, contribute to the household food waste problem, so it was great to see my local supermarket being responsible and helpful.

How was the food waste situation at your place this week? How do you use your freezer to reduce your  food waste?

Shopping online to spend less

It is Food Waste Friday and I’m pleased to say that being accountable for my waste is making a real difference.

I got asked a great question this week (thanks Pip): “Have you found that doing it in public has helped more than just giving yourself a stern talking to?”.

The answer is a big YES. Obviously, going public is highly motivating, but there is more to it than that. Before starting this project, I felt guilty about my waste, but harsh self-criticism and bad feelings weren’t making much of a difference. Now when I waste food, I don’t feel as bad about it. I know I’ve made a good effort to reduce my waste and I use it as a learning opportunity to improve my systems.

And it is working! This week I’m happy to report zero food waste – until this happened.

Food Waste Friday, Food waste, shopping
Broken jar of capsicums – #FoodWasteFriday 10 July 2015

I had my groceries delivered via online shopping this morning. Unfortunately a jar of roasted capsicums broke en-route to our place.

I seriously considered emptying the contents of the jar into a sieve and giving it a good rinse. However, I really don’t want to risk feeding my family glass. That might take my mission to reduce waste a bit too far. Maybe if the jar was just cracked, but it was actually smashed. So, unfortunately, it had to go in the bin.

I used to use online shopping for groceries regularly when my son was a newborn. Now, I only use it once every couple of months. Today, it was because we really needed food and my husband had the car all day for a meeting in an out-of-the-way location.

I have noticed that when I buy my groceries online I always spend less. This isn’t because it’s cheaper, but because I buy less. It is much less tempting to pop extras into my online shopping cart than my in-store one. It got me thinking that online shopping might be a good tool for people who regularly over-buy due to in-store temptation.

A final note, a big thank you to Love Food Hate Waste NZ who spread the word about #FoodWasteFriday last week.

How was your food waste situation this week? Do you buy groceries online? How do you find the experience compared to in-store shopping?

Be the change: The Minimalist Game Days 22–30

I successfully made it through to the end of the Minimalist Game. Along the way, I learnt about change and momentum – how starting small can make a big difference.

Minimalism, The Minimalist Game, #minsgame, decluttering
The Minimalist Game Days 22 to 30

The final days

I really felt the heat from day 25 onwards as I worked to reach my daily goal. However, I managed to power on through. With three weeks of decluttering decisions under my belt, I was able to work at a much faster pace. No longer was I umm-ing and ahh-ing over each individual item, I was discarding more but using less mental energy to do so. I was riding on the wave of momentum.

Be the change you want to see in the world

The momentum that I built up over the course of the Minimalist Game didn’t stop with me – it spread to others too.

When I rid my drawers of excess t-shirts, following my example, so did my husband. He then helped me go through a box of miscellaneous electrical items. While doing this, he remarked, “But, you’re right about all this stuff – it’s just clutter”.

The momentum spread beyond my own household. I mentioned to two friends and a family member what I was doing this month. They each independently embarked on decluttering exercises of their own.

When I started playing the Minimalist Game I thought there was a bit of an inner hoarder in most of us. This hasn’t changed. I now think, at the same time, there is a lot of dissatisfaction with clutter amongst most of us too. My friends and family just needed the tiniest bit of inspiration/solidarity/permission from someone they trusted and they were off. My experience with the Minimalist Game showed me the power of example.

I often feel powerless in the face of rampant consumerism, but after playing the Minimalist Game I have hope. Doing nothing won’t change anything. Even the smallest step in the right direction is a start. The steps build and then have a momentum of their own.

“If we could change ourselves, the tendencies in the world would also change. As a man changes his own nature, so does the attitude of the world change towards him. We need not wait to see what others do.” – Gandhi

Have you taken steps towards a minimalist lifestyle? What inspired you to do this?

The week of the Wii – The Minimalist Game Days 1 to 7

Help I’m hoarding for the environment – The Minimalist Game Days 8 to 14

The cost of free stuff – The Minimalist Game Days 15 to 21

It’s not a bargain if you bin it

Welcome to Food Waste Friday. This week, I fell victim to the supermarket’s super-marketers.

First, the good news. The system I implemented last week – designating a shelf in the fridge for items that need to be used up ASAP – is working well. All leftovers, half used jars of tomato paste, etc., were used up.

Food waste, Food Waste Friday, shopping
Broccoli to the bin – Food Waste Friday 3 July 2015

The bad news –1 ¼ heads of broccoli in the bin. I went to steam and puree it on Monday (in an attempt to save it) but it was too far gone. This was a clear case of “bargain blinkers”. Broccoli wasn’t on my shopping list, but I couldn’t resist it at a bargain two for $3. Wow, I could save $1 by buying two! So I did, but I barely used any of it – really, I wasted $2 and a lot of broccoli.

I have written before about how my desire to bag a bargain ends up costing me money and my efforts to overcome this. Today, I’m adding a new mantra for the supermarket:

“It’s not a bargain if you bin it.”

Are you a sucker for supermarket multi-buys? How was the food waste situation at your house this week?

Food waste – perception vs reality

It is Friday, so it’s time to stand up and account for my food waste.

How did I do this week?
Not great. Food wasted:
• 1 kiwifruit
• 1 mandarin
• 1 lime
• ¼ bottle of passata

#foodwastefriday, food waste
This week’s waste – #FoodWasteFriday 26 June 2015

This was an eye opener. I thought I was doing really well and on track for zero food waste this week. Wrong.

Three quarters of people think they waste less than average
I am not alone. I read ‘You’re wasting more food than you think’ in Mother Jones this week. Turns out, most Americans underestimate how much food they waste.

I am curious how my food waste stacks up against the average, so I’m going to estimate the value of each item that goes to waste and see how it tallies up.

Planning and routine
I received some excellent tips from readers about reducing food waste. Two things shone through for me – planning and routine.

I now have a designated spot in the fridge for things that need to be used urgently. I wanted somewhere prominent, to keep “at risk” items front of mind. I chose the bottom shelf, on top of the vegetable crisper. I am also training myself to put things into the fridge so that their expiry date can be seen.

Based on this week’s waste, I’m going to add a more thorough check of the fruit bowl to my routine too.

Save of the week
I had half a head of cabbage sitting in the crisper starting to look sad. I saved it by making a batch of Cabbage, carrot and caraway broth from Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s River Cottage: Light & Easy. Unfortunately, this recipe isn’t published online, but it’s a simple mix of cabbage, carrot, onions and stock – great for cleaning out the fridge and perfect for the cold snap we had this week.

However, my best save was at the grocery store this afternoon. Kiwifruit was on sale for a mere $1.98 a kilo. I was tempted to buy some, but I decided against it after remembering the one I threw out this morning. I wanted to buy it more because it was cheap than because I wanted it. So it stayed on the shelves – it’s not a bargain if it’s just going to end up in the bin.

How did you go with your food waste this week? Do you have any good fridge-clearing recipes to share?

Thanks to sharing – old and new

This month I’ve been on a decluttering mission. I am playing The Minimalist Game, attempting to rid my home of 564 items in a month. One unexpected outcome of this mission – gratitude for the sharing economy.

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Thanks to the sharing economy

The sharing economy has come in for a bit of a backlash recently as community turns corporate, but I have a lot to thank it for this month.

Sorting through my home, I’ve experienced a range of feelings ­ guilt, overwhelm, joy, excitement. Undertaking this exercise has prompted me to search for ways of living with less. It has made me realise how grateful I am for the various ways that I can use and enjoy stuff without having to own it.

Old school sharing economy

While books and toys are often particularly difficult areas for people to declutter, they were relatively easy for me. I didn’t really have much book and toy clutter thanks to the stalwarts of the sharing economy – the library.

I love libraries. I have at various times worked as a librarian. To me, the library provides a world of possibilities. Through the library I can access virtually any book that I desire at no cost. Sure, I sometimes have to wait and I sometimes have to read faster than I’d Iike – but I don’t have to own anything.

I am also very grateful for our local toy library. It ensures my son gets to play with an ever-changing rotation of high quality toys. And, when he’s bored with them, they don’t hang around our house getting in the way – they go right back where they came from for other kids to enjoy. The wee guy loves his fortnightly trips to the toy library to return his toys and bring home some new ones. If you have young kids, I really recommend checking out if there is one near you.

New school sharing economy

Technology can create clutter but it can also help you clear clutter. I no longer need to hang on to those CDs and DVDs – if I want to listen to it or watch it I can stream it.

New school sharing really came into its own when I wanted to get rid of stuff. I realised that a barrier to decluttering was the guilt I felt about waste and my desire to find things a good new home. Sharing information through social media gave me a quick and easy way to do this. Through local and special-interest Facebook groups, my stuff is out of my house and with people who want it.

Decluttering this month playing The Miniminalist Game has taken a weight off my mind and loads out of my house. Thank you, sharing economy –I appreciate how you enable me to live more with less.

Are you trying to live more with less? What things do you share rather than own?

 This is my first post as part of the Gratitude Circle – expect more like this the 4th Thursday of every month.

Gratitude-Circle